3 Myths Of Corrective Exercise: Strength Prevents Injuries

3 Myths of Corrective Exercise Part 2

This is a 4-part blog and video series put together by Dr. Evan Osar to help you uncover the 3 biggest myths surrounding corrective exercise and help you create a strategy to overcome so you can help your clients get faster, better results.

Part 1: 3 Myths Of Corrective Exercise: It’s NOT about correcting dysfunction

Part 2: [You Are Here]  3 Myths Of Corrective Exercise: Strength Prevents Injuries

Part 3: 3 Myths of Corrective Exercise: All Clients Have the Same Problem & There’s Only One Solution

Part 4: 3 Myths of Corrective Exercise: The Solution—Your Corrective Exercise Program System 

Welcome back to video two of the 3 Myths of Corrective Exercise! In the first video, we talked about the first myth of corrective exercise, which is that corrective exercise corrects dysfunction.

The goal of corrective exercise is not to correct dysfunction, as we discussed, but to help our clients develop a more ideal postural and movement strategy. We strive to teach the nervous system to hold a more optimal alignment, to breathe better, and to control the body better so our clients can hold proper posture and move with greater efficiency and without so much compensation, which is a key factor in many of our clients’ problems and loss of performance.

Myth #2—Strength Prevents Injuries

As strength conditioning specialists, we like to believe this myth because we think the stronger somebody is, the better they are, and the fewer injuries they’ll have.

I’ve been working with clients and patients for the last 17 years, and some of the most dysfunctional individuals whom I assess and work on are the strongest individuals.

Strength by itself does not prevent injuries.

How, then, do we prevent injuries?

What really prevents injuries is helping your client develop an improved strategy for posture and movement. What, then, are the key components to developing an improved strategy for posture and movement?

To improve your clients’ posture and movement, you must get them to understand and incorporate the fundamental ABC’s—the fundamental principles of the Integrated Movement System™.

A = Alignment

You have to teach your clients how to develop the optimal alignment, so when they load the joint, the joint is loaded in the right direction and position.

One way to visualize this principle is to point your finger straight up. If you place the palm of your other hand on the tip of that finger (similar to a “timeout” gesture) and apply force down through the finger, you could hold your finger like this for a long time and not have any issues because you’re loading the joint in the most optimal position.

Now, bend your finger back so it is no longer straight up but is pointing as far away from its palm as it can go. If you try to make the same “timeout” gesture with your other hand and apply force down through the finger, you can’t do that for very long before your finger would be very uncomfortable because it is being bent even further back.

This same concept applies to all the joints in your body: There are maximally optimal positions for loading, and there are suboptimal positions for loading. Our goal is to help our clients align better so that they can put less wear and tear on their joint structures.

B = Breathing

We must breathe three dimensionally, or have access to our entire thoracopelvic canister, from top to bottom and from the top of our lung field to our pelvic floor.

We must be able to breathe laterally, or side to side. We must be able to breathe front to back so that we can access the entire diaphragm; all the intercostal muscles between the ribs; the deep myofascial system; and muscles like the psoas, transverse abdominis, and multifidi.

All these muscles coordinate with one another in the process of breathing, which also enables us to stabilize. The primary stabilization of our core should come from internal regulation of pressure—intrathoracic and intra-abdominal pressure. That’s what core stability is really all about.

It’s not about bracing or squeezing muscles—that’s a part of core stabilization, but it’s not the primary component of core stabilization. Therefore, it’s not strength that prevents injuries; it’s the ability to align and breathe.

C = Control

Once we align the body in the right position, and once we have proper three-dimensional breathing, we must be able to control our body positions. So whether we’re in a static position, performing a dynamic movement, or moving through the fundamental movement patterns (squatting, lunging, pushing, pulling, bending, rotating in gait), we must be able to use the right muscles at the right time in the right manner to control the joint for the activity that you are trying to do.

The “right muscles” and “right manner” will both change depending upon the different activities we need to do. For example, your clients’ resting postural strategy should be different than what they would do if they were squatting 300 pounds. Certainly, we should have alignment of the thoracopelvic canister both in quiet standing and during a deadlift or squat pattern. What changes however, is the level of activation.

When we’re quietly standing in posture, we should have very little activity of the core muscles; they shouldn’t be off, but there should be very little activity: Our glutes, abdominals, and erectors should be soft. This is similar to how you wouldn’t walk around with your biceps contracted all day long, your abs gripped up all day long, your low back tightened all day long, or your glutes gripped up all day long.

As an exercise, stand up if you are sitting right now. Feel your glutes. They should be soft. Feel around your abdomen, and feel around your lower back. They should all be soft while at rest. This doesn’t mean they’re not toned—in fact, they should be soft, just like how your biceps should be soft at rest.

When we need them to activate to lift a heavy weight, lift a child, lift a bag of groceries, do a sled push, etc., we need a higher level of activity. The key is to use the right strategy at the right time so that we have the control we need for, in this example, thoracopelvic canister.

So when I’m squatting 300 pounds, I have a nice controlled thoracopelvic canister where I’m braced up and able to use intra-abdominal and intrathoracic pressure, and I’m able to layer my abdominal muscles, my low back muscles, and my hip muscles. But when I’m done with that squat pattern, I leave the gym, and I’m living my life, those muscles should release and become soft. What we see with our general population clients specifically is they are not stopping their gripping/bracing strategy when they leave their exercise session, and that’s what starts to put wear and tear upon the joints, overuses the muscles, and creates a lot of compensation.

So what prevents injuries? It’s not about strength.

All things being equal, strength will help you prevent injuries, but all things are not equal with our clients. Most of our clients do not have an ideal or optimal postural and movement strategy.

They don’t have great alignment, they don’t have great breathing, and they don’t have great control. They default to gripping, bracing, and doing very accessory dominant breathing as their strategy, and that leads to compensation.

So what helps prevent injuries?

The fundamental ABC’s: alignment, breathing, and control, which should be 3 primary areas of focus in corrective exercise.

We’ll be back with the Myth #3 soon…

FR-ICEA-FR Nation-Blog Ad-Product

Let us know what you think

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 Comments

  • Thanks for the video Evan. I’m an acupuncturist, remedial massage therapist and Taiji practitioner in Australia and an osteopath colleague of mine put me onto your blog. It’s great to hear a lot of the foundations of movement and posture from the perspective of Taiji and Qigong explained in a way that is easy to understand for the general public. As a health professional as well I’m always looking for new strategies to offer to my clients and always interested in different perspectives on how to look at the human body, movement and force transmission. Thanks again and keep up the good work. Jim

  • Ingrid says:

    Awesome! I like the use of “A,B,C” that makes it easy to remember and communicate to clients. As a Pilates instructor, the belief is that EVERYTHING starts with the core. I believe this wholeheartedly; breathing and control and alignment are the essentials of Pilates. I find it interesting, too, that several traditional exercisers are so unaware of the ABC’s when moving through activities of daily life, let alone exercises and find Pilates boring and say they don’t “feel anything” because they cannot connect the ABC’s effectively! Your analogies not only make it easy for trainers to grasp this, but easy to communicate to clients! Thanks for sharing!!