Blog

COVID-19EmployeesReopening
[ April 29, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Talk About Reopening With This Group First

With states starting to loosen Covid-19 restrictions on businesses, how developed is your plan to reopen your gym?

A major component of that plan must be communications – and as you’re developing the rollout, remember who you need to speak with before going public:

Your team.

Download our free list of resources to protect your business during the COVID-19 crisis.

That’s right. Before you announce your plans to your members or community, you need to meet with your employees first. 

Don’t assume they’ll do what they’re told, or that they’re as thrilled as you might be to reopen. They might have fears or other issues you need to address before going public.

You should also talk to your business coach or mentor. If you don’t have one, click on our resources document here to talk with one of ours. A Fitness Revolution coach can help you prepare for these conversations – why they’re important, and how to keep them productive. 

Why You Need Their Input

Savvy business leaders already know to communicate clearly and regularly with their employees, pandemic or not. You see it from the well-managed Fortune 500 companies as well as the best-run small businesses. 

Your employees have valuable insights and thoughts to share. Granted, they might also have thoughts that aren’t so valuable or insightful – just like everyone else. And that’s OK.

  • You can’t manage a smooth reopening without their buy-in and support.
  • You’ll learn valuable insight about your staff, business and customers.
  • You’ll build rapport and respect by showing that you listen as well as dictate.
  • Your team will appear united with clients, prospects and the community, which will increase your success with clients and prospects.

Two Main Reasons They Might Balk

If some team members say have misgivings about coming back, ask them why and listen.

First, is it possible some of them just don’t want to work? Maybe they’re enjoying the “time off,” happily drawing unemployment, and don’t have their head in the business. You might have some individual personnel issues. And this is the best way to spot them, rather than having to react later.

Second, others truly might be uncomfortable about coming back, mingling with other people, touching items that others have touched, etc. Address their concerns if possible. It could make your gym a better environment for clients, as well. 

Tell your team what you’re doing to protect their health and safety. Develop consistent messaging and deliver it in all channels. Remember it’s on to communicate with each of them, and to be sure they understand what you’re doing and what steps you will take in the future.

You Might Have to Let Go of Some

If unemployment benefits are part of the conversation, remind everyone that you offer more than a paycheck, maybe even healthcare benefits at some gyms. 

You might have to make decisions about individuals. Can someone manage administrative work or virtual workouts from home? Can you divvy up in-house time so no one feels singled out?

You might need to let some people go. Again, better to know now so you can be proactive about it.

For those who have received PPP or have applied, remember that you need to maintain the number of your full-time equivalent positions – not the same people in them.

This is a difficult time for everyone. Ultimately, you’re the one to decide what’s right for your business. We’re here to help, with free resources to provide information and context – along with the invaluable relationships gym owners develop with our coaches. We’re always happy to talk.

ArticlesCOVID-19MarketingReopeningSelling
[ April 23, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Your Guide to Reopening After COVID-19

Everyone’s wondering when they can reopen their gyms. While we can’t give a certain date, we can tell you that right now is the time to plan for it.

It’s a confusing period, and the situation will keep changing in the weeks and months ahead. Reopening gyms is in Phase 1 of the federal reopening guidelines announced recently by President Trump. It will be up to individual governors when to allow states to reopen. And it will be up to each business owner after that.

Check out our free guide to reopening your gym after COVID-19.

This post will help you create your own reopening plan, along with an ongoing operating plan, as we keep adjusting. It’s time to ask questions, do research, make best-guess decisions – and remember that not everything will go according to plan. That’s OK — you’re creating a guide, not a pillar.

Here are questions to consider:

  • What do I need to be thinking about right now? 
  • What do I need to be doing right now?
  • How will reopening affect my service delivery, revenue and expenses?
  • Will my pre-pandemic business model be sustainable in the new market?

We recommend following these planning steps:

  • Review your current business plan/strategy
  • Determine what adjustments you need to make to operate right now
  • Talk to your Fitness Revolution Success Coach™ (if you don’t have one, talk to one of our FR Success Coaches here)
  • Firm up your plan and act swiftly and decisively (while assessing and adjusting weekly)

Here are some topics to guide your thinking.

  • Services: What adjustments should you make? Consider class size, physical space, and social distancing. Will you continue online training? Do you have outdoor options?
  • Plans: Do you have them in case someone tests positive or you’re ordered to close again?
  • Money: What’s your plan for clients coming back from freezes? Will you need separate pricing and marketing for in-person vs. virtual training? Update your budget to account for additional cleaning. Create processes for tracking PPP or other government funds.
  • Communications: Include staff, clients, prospects, vendors, neighbors, etc. Use every channel. Repeat consistent messaging. Tell them about service changes, new rules, safety procedures, and anything they’ll need to feel confident about returning.
  • Safety: How do you keep your gym clean and everyone safe? Intensify your cleaning procedures to include door handles, light switches, water fountains, etc. Update supply lists. Consider outside help. Post signs so staff and members know what you’re doing.

By planning now and continually reviewing, you’ll serve your clients better today and on the other side of this. You’ll be better prepared to bring on new clients, as well, and to keep your staff united – and everyone safe.

Check out the free guide we’ve put together to prepare your business.

ArticlesCOVID-19For Business OwnersMarketingSelling
[ April 8, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Selling Your Services Amid the COVID-19 Outbreak

During the COVID-19 outbreak, some business owners are unsure about how much focus they should devote to making sales. Fitness professionals have asked us repeatedly if they need to be selling at this time – or just generating leads to use later.

It’s a fair question with a simple answer: You have to keep doing both, now and always.

Download our free list of resources to protect your business during the COVID-19 crisis.

This is not profiteering. It is not unethical. It is not inappropriate. 

It’s your commitment to your business, your employees, your customers and your community. And like everything else nowadays, it just takes nimble thinking and determination to continually assess and re-evaluate.

Let’s break it down into four components.

Messaging. Strong communication is everything. You must position your offer well. Remember:

  • This is the new normal. At least for the time being, you’re an online fitness business owner, so embrace it.
  • Customers’ fitness needs remain, and they still want your expertise, time and support. Your messaging should lead with the value and benefits you bring, like accountability and community.
  • Keep the focus on how you’re helping clients and on what your prospects need.

Marketing. You never stop getting new leads and building your prospects list. It’s an essential task of your business. Try ideas like these to gain email addresses:

  • Create compelling content to drive traffic to your blog, podcasts and webinars.
  • Give away valuable resources (like e-books and cheat sheets) as lead magnets.
  • Run a sweepstakes or a contest.

Selling. Leads are important, but you’ve got to convert them to bring in any revenue. Here are some smart tactics:

  • Direct-response advertising on social media or search engines will direct traffic to your offer.
  • Referrals and “bring a friend to Zoom” promotions are opportunities for exposure, community-building and feedback.
  • Exchange email blasts with a joint-venture partner. (This is good for building your list as well as selling.)

Adjustments. Keep your long-term offers and pricing strategies in place. Add value wherever you can. But in rare instances, consider how you might make modifications.

  • Can you change the terms – say, from annual to monthly agreements, or make one-time sales to some prospects?
  • Create a new front-end offer at a lower price point and see what adjustments you can make to transfer them to your core offer.
  • Have something like this as a last resort, unpromoted: a low-cost, weekly option for clients in a financial jam. 

By always spinning both the marketing and the sales wheels, you’re doing the right thing for your business now during the crisis – and for the future, whatever it might look like.

Fitness Revolution is here to help you through these challenges. We’re sharing resources here to protect your business and to help you stay alert to the challenges and, yes, opportunities ahead. 

 

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ April 1, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Stay Focused on the Guideposts and Alert for the Opportunities

If you’re like millions of people, you turned on your computer or TV this morning and swiftly got caught in the swirl of anxiety-inducing news, opinion, advice, complaints, misinformation, and grief mixed in with random cat videos and inspirational quotes.

It’s enough to make you want to go back to bed, pull the covers over your head, and hope for a miracle.

Download our free list of resources to protect your business during the COVID-19 crisis.

So, stop for a minute. Breathe. Clear your mind. And focus on guideposts to help you stay on track. When your mind drifts away in scary “What If” scenarios, return your attention to the basics of what you can do about it.

Expenses vs. Investments

What are some investments that you must maintain, even during tough situations? Here are three that will keep you strong now – because this is no time to become a weaker business.

  • Marketing. Communicating with your market is always critical. Every day — period. Keep reaching out to clients, nurturing prospects, and generating leads.

What are your differentiators? Some larger chains can’t provide the virtual options that you can. Some of your other competitors are refusing to market and will disappear over time. If they’re around when this all ends, what kind of relationships will they have with clients and prospects then?

  • Consulting. You don’t want every negative comment on Twitter to send you into a tailspin. By the same token, you need coaches, mentors or consultants in your corner to help you see the big picture.

It’s so easy to get in our heads, lose perspective, or miss valuable insight that can come from someone removed from the daily grind of our business. A good coach or mentor is watching the industry overall and talking with others in your situation, so he or she can reveal connections and pathways to consider.

  • Personnel: Your team is a vital resource. It’s invaluable to delegate to employees so you have time to focus on mission-critical activities.

Divvy up duties. Assign trainers to lead online sessions. Put some in charge of updating individual clients. Your employees are valuable assets to deploy strategically.

Costs You Can Manage Right Now

  • Cancel non-investment costs: These produce no income and are not required to keep your business alive (premium versions of apps, software subscriptions, entertainment, etc.)
  • Apply for government aid: Assistance is available to help small businesses. Look into your options, starting with the Small Business Administration. Once you’ve taken steps to increase revenue like this, you can try to trim basic expenses.
  • Then, negotiate with people you pay: Talk with your vendors, suppliers, accountant and landlord to explore flexibility they might have. Try to meet in the middle somewhere.
  • Hold off on upgrades: That big piece of new equipment you’ve been wanting to buy? Delay purchases like this for now.

Amid all this uncertainty is great opportunity. More will be emerging that you might be able to see today. Keep your eyes open. Remember the guideposts and the principles that put them there.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ March 25, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Why You Must Keep Marketing During the Crisis

In times of crisis, people seek leadership – whether in medicine, government or business. And now more than ever, your gym’s clients and prospects are counting on you to help them stay fit, which includes reminding and updating them about your services and expertise.

We’re not talking about dispensing medical advice or running for office.

We’re talking about marketing in a way that is helpful to your community and smart for your business.

Download free resources to help during the COVID-19 outbreak. We’ll keep updating with more information.

That means adjusting your services and offerings, yes. It also means communicating. It means marketing.

And that’s not only morally OK, it’s absolutely the right thing to do.

First, let’s address a misconception we’re hearing from some fitness professionals. We’ve been asked recently if it’s somehow unethical to promote your business and seek payment during the coronavirus crisis – as if the idea implies taking advantage.

It does not. You must continue marketing, which is a necessary business function – a “must have” rather than a “nice to have.” Don’t retreat into a limiting belief about your value out of a vaguely uncomfortable feeling. There is no ethical conflict in responsibly reminding people you can help them and providing a service in exchange for a reasonable fee.

Let’s clarify what’s OK by sharing an appalling example of what’s not: Price gouging of hand sanitizer or medical equipment during a public-health crisis. Would you even consider hoarding Purell and selling it at astronomically inflated prices to desperate neighbors? Of course not. Now, THAT is unethical.

Contrast that to staying in front of your clients and prospects, providing modified workouts or training online, sharing useful information and positive coaching, and – yes – doing so for money. Remember that your customers are counting on you to help solve a problem, and your employees are counting on you to stay in business.

Here are some actions you can be taking:

  • Keep your messages clear and helpful.
  • Pro-actively help your people transition with information and attentive customer service.
  • Reduce what you’re spending on ads to maintenance level.
  • Focus more on content marketing, which is much cheaper. That means posting on Facebook, sending more emails, and updating your website.
  • Explore high-demand joint ventures, like meal delivery.
  • Review our free, downloadable FAQs for help on pricing, delivering services, marketing and more.

Keep your eye on the future, too. What new opportunities will come out of this? What potential obstacles could you face? Where will your competitors be in a few months? The ones who disappear now will have the hardest time re-emerging.

Change is inevitable. But focus on elements of success that remain solid, like keeping your eyes open; caring for customers and team members; and sharing what you have to offer.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ March 18, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Are You Ready for Virtual Training?

We’re all having to be flexible, creative and service-focused during the coronavirus crisis. The good news is, you’re not alone in figuring out how to proceed to protect your team, your clients and your business.

If you can’t deliver your services in person, then you need to be able to do so virtually. You can offer recorded training online, or set up live streaming sessions for individuals or groups.

But first, remember this: Don’t overthink it. Your clients know you’re in an unprecedented situation, and they won’t expect everything to be perfectly buttoned-up right away. You can always adjust, and you should. But right now, what they need from you is communications, support and – the reason they came to you in the first place – training!

We’ve gathered free resources to help during the COVID-19 outbreak. We’ll continually update it with more information.

When trying to decide what to include, keep in mind:

  • Your core offer 
  • The price point 
  • Base access and touchpoints off their current service level. For example: you may need to meet with a Personal Training Client weekly via Zoom vs. monthly for a Group Training Client.
  • Consider how you distribute the workload and among your staff.

We have identified three situations you might be in regarding all this, and we’ve developed guidance on steps for each of them. 

No. 1, The Basics: My gym just closed and I have nothing virtual set up yet.

Do This Now: First, email or call clients and let them know what to expect from you – even if you don’t have every detail figured out. Second, create a private, free community on Facebook or Instagram and share a similar message, encourage client interaction, and share daily workouts, motivations, and recipes.

No. 2, Improving Your Virtual Delivery (Group Training): I’ve done the above, and want to add value to my virtual Group Training.

Do This Now: Lead live workouts daily via Zoom or Facebook, share instructions so members can join, and let them know what space and equipment they’ll need. Also: personally check in with clients, while also sending a weekly email with a Google form that lets them share progress. 

No. 3, Improving Your Virtual Delivery (Semi-Private and Personal Training): I have the basics covered. How do I improve my non-group training?

Do This Now: Consider designing monthly programs delivered individually through emails, training platforms, or Google sheets). Find out what equipment they have, include links to demo videos, and check in weekly so they can share their progress and questions. You might develop nutrition coaching, as well.

The global pandemic is disrupting everything for everyone – but remember, we will get through it. And it’s up to everyone to support each other and keep their businesses and services available as much as possible. 

Consult this list of free resources we’ve put together for you – on protecting your business, communications, and more. Stay strong!

Hand Picking Ideal Job Candidate
ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ March 11, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Put Your Ideal Client Profiles to Work

When you were creating your business, who did you envision as the ideal client?

Were you building a gym primarily for, say, young men who want to be competitive bodybuilders?

For women in their 20s and 30s who want to stay in shape before, during, and after their pregnancies?

Or were you aiming to attract, say, people over 60 who are interested primarily in functional fitness?

It’s not enough to just think about your ideal client and move on. You also need to create a fully developed Ideal Client Profile – and then use it constantly to attract new leads, convert them to clients, and shape your entire marketing programs. These are ongoing efforts throughout the life of your gym – whether you are just opening your doors or you’re ready to expand with new locations.

Where is your gym on the success path? Take our short, easy and free survey to find out where you are, so we can help you get to the next stage.

At Fitness Revolution, we’ll help you build Ideal Client Profiles for each of your core offerings. That’s one part of this, and crucial. But just as important is the next step, which too many gym owners ignore: We’ll show you how to use the profiles to serve your overall growth strategy. Here are some of the key points about Ideal Client Profiles.

  • They determine your marketing activities by defining your main audience.
  • You use them when creating your marketing calendar. If your ideal client has kids in school, for example, then you probably don’t want to run a promotion during spring break.
  • They help you decide what to include in your newsletters, ads and social media posts. Who’s reading this? What do they want to know about?
  • They help you decide where to focus your marketing time and money. Where does your target audience look for information?
  • You should refer to your profiles when changing your website.
  • And you’ll review them when deciding to attend networking or community events.

If you don’t know who you’re trying to reach – or if you don’t regularly remind yourself about your defined, intended audience — then you’re just talking into the wind.

Ideal Client Profiles help you identify your target audience, get their attention, and communicate why your solution is best for them.

Throughout the life of your business, you might have more than one core offering. And you might want to pursue multiple types of “ideal clients” for different services. These same systems will help you stay focused on each of them.

And just like you must know your audience to focus on them, you also must know your current stage of success so you can get to the next one. We’re here to guide you on that success journey by first evaluating where you are right now. Answer 10 short questions here and we’ll be off and running.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ March 4, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Decoding Sales Objections: When They Say This…They Mean That

Overcoming sales objections is key to growing your business. But before you can overcome them, you need to understand them. 

Most skepticism falls into one of two categories. Either there’s a lack of understanding between you and the prospects, or they don’t see how your service will solve their problem.

If we understand what’s underlying their objections, we can respond with points that will make the sale – or, at least, gain insight into adjusting our sales process, if necessary. And that is huge: We get better sales conversations in real time, and we learn how to deal with similar objections in the future.

Fitness Revolution teaches a highly effective sales process. That’s the first element of overcoming objections. We also provide response strategies to bust through these roadblocks.

Here are a few examples of decoding the objections.

  • Price. “It’s too expensive” or “I can’t afford it” are the most common pushbacks. What they really mean: They’re not sure your service is worth the price or that they’ll get a return on their investment.
  • Thinking. “I need to think about it.” What they really mean: This could be true, a genuine part of their buying process. But it could also be a smokescreen to get out of the conversation because they don’t see the value.
  • Decision-maker. “I have to talk to my significant other.” What they really mean: Again, this could be true on its face. Or… it could be another way to dodge the real reason they’re reluctant to join your gym.
  • Time. “I just don’t have time to commit to a program.” Ah, we hear this all the time, right? What they really mean: They don’t truly understand your service – or they like the way they’re living now more than they value what you can do for them.

Here we have identified the four most common types of objections and translated them into bottom-line truths that can help you in the next steps of the conversation. Strategic responses will a) address the true nature of the doubts and b) keep the conversation moving toward a sale.

Your sales process has stages, obviously. And, so does your gym’s business development, whether you’re a newbie or a road-tested vet.

We help you get from one stage to the next (and the next…). First, we need to learn where you are right now on that fitness journey. So, take our quick and painless 10-question survey to give us some basic information about your current situation. We’ll evaluate where you are today – and what you need to do tomorrow and beyond.

Objections to that?

Overruled.

Two muscular men are making fist bump gesture during workout in the gym
ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ February 28, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

5 Things to Consider When Hiring

Growing your business can come with common growing pains. But if you know where you’re headed, challenges can be a good thing, providing lessons on how to improve and clarity about direction. 

Let’s think about hiring, for instance — staffing up with the right people in the right roles at the right time.

What does your gym need at this stage? Give us 2 minutes and we’ll show you how to keep moving toward success. 

Whether your gym is just starting or is far along on its success journey, you need a recruitment process to identify the best trainers, assistants, marketers and more – new team members who will help get you to the next stage of development.

You’ll find yourself wondering when’s the right time to expand with a new position? Which role deserves the most attention at this point? How do I not get burned (again)?

It’s all part of building a real business and not trying to do everything yourself.

You need a good recruitment process, and Fitness Revolution helps gym owners build a system that will contribute to your growth at every stage. Here are a handful of concepts to consider.

1 – Stages. The recruitment process should have stages of its own, from creating a job description to sharing it, then screening candidates, interviewing top prospects, and onboarding a team member. You can’t just wing it every time; employees are simply too important to your growth.

2 – Salary. Whichever role you’re filling, you need to know the pay range you can afford right now. You don’t want to pursue, say, a senior trainer when you can pay only for a newcomer. Conversely, you don’t want to miss out on top talent by lowballing them.

3 – Clarity. Create a job description that states the responsibilities of the job. Clarity is good for candidates, you, and your other team members. Also include how a new hire’s performance will be evaluated, and how the role fits into the gym’s overall mission and culture.

4 – Mining. Just like you have channels in place to generate customer leads, you’ll need to identify the places to look for talent. The good news is, you probably already have many of them: your friends, associates, social media, community involvement, and professional organizations. But how do you engage them to help with hiring?

5 – Questions. You need to know more about a candidate than basic qualifications. For instance, how do you determine if he or she brings the right intangible qualities? Be prepared with a script or at least a conversation guide for phone screening and face-to-face interviews. Consider, too, background checks and references at the proper point.

Fitness Revolution has helped countless gyms grow from conception through each stage of development, all the way to successful achievement of goals.

We do it by first learning where your gym is today on its own road to success. And we do that by asking you 10 short, simple questions that yield key insights about what’s coming – including the next potential pain and how to turn it into just growth. Start right here.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ February 19, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

How to Identify Your Company’s Core Values

Companies that develop a strong culture succeed more than those that muddle around without a clear presence or identity.  

And a key component of a company’s culture is its values: What are the its beliefs? How does it guide its people’s behavior and standards?

Values shape every decision a business makes. For example, internally, values define standards for hiring, firing, and rewarding employees – and externally, they guide your relationships with clients, vendors, and your community.

So, every business needs to develop, identify, and promote its values. This grows more urgent as you develop your company through the stages of its success journey. Surely by the time you’re scaling your business, creating a public identity, and staffing up, you need to know what you’re all about. And you need to make it clear to everyone every day.

What’s your gym’s current stage of business development? It just takes 2 minutes to answer 10 questions to find out.

How, then, do you figure out your company’s values? It’s a slow, thoughtful process – not something to bang out in a single meeting. And here are a few ideas to keep in mind. 

  1. Brainstorm with your leadership team and your employees about the qualities your company should exemplify. (Remember, there’s no right or wrong answer or good/bad suggestion when brainstorming.)
  2. Group the ideas to clarify their meaning and avoid redundancies.
  3. Start eliminating them, aiming for 3 to 7 ideas that you want to build into action-oriented values.
  4. During the process, use some extreme ideas to find out what your gym is all about. For instance, do you want your culture to be direct and no-nonsense, even if it seems rude? Or do you want it to be nice and conflict-averse, even if it means no one’s ever really clear about touchy subjects? Are you so “innovative” that you rush to seize every new technological tool – or so afraid of new things that you miss out on useful advances?
  5. Be sure everyone feels included – from top down AND from down up. You won’t get employee buy-in if it’s all an executive order, while the team will need your leadership in words and actions.
  6. When you have your list of proposed values, put it in a drawer and forget about it for a month. You might want to make some adjustments after some time has passed.
  7. Finally, make your values known to everyone all the time. Display them in your company handbook, on your website, and at the sign-in desk. Promoting your values distinguishes your company like a stake in the ground: This Is Us (and This Is NOT Us).

Fitness Revolution’s client-partners receive thorough coaching on how to develop and share your core values. We’ll also help you keep an open mind for an occasional tweak that honors where you’ve been while clarifying where you’re headed.

Values make up your culture, and the right components of both will get you to the next stage of business development – and beyond. Let us evaluate where you are today on your success path – and how to get you all the way to the goal. It takes just 2 minutes to answer 10 questions and get started on the ride of your life.

People drinking protein shakes at the fitness bar in a gym
ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ February 12, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

7 Tips to Keep Your Clients Engaged

To keep clients coming back year after year, you need to do more than help them reach their fitness goals.

You need to engage them on a continuing basis — while they’re in your gym and even while they’re away.

“Engagement” is more than just a buzzword. It’s the connection between your client and your business through various channels – in person, through social media, through email marketing and advertising, in your community, etc. It’s how you create strong emotional bonds so they feel like a part of your business.

But it’s about much more than feelings. Evidence is clear that clients who are highly engaged spend more money with you. They stay longer. And they bring you more referrals.

Whether your business is just starting out or is already established, you need consistent, dedication to keep your customers engaged.

You have big dreams about where you’re headed. But do you know where your business is right now? Find out in just 2 minutes with our simple, free survey.

Here are 7 tips to use every day.

  1. Apply the Human Touch. Yes, social media and automation are important. But so is making in-person connections with your clients and getting to know them face to face.
  2. Create the Right Client Experience. From onboarding through the initial 30 days and beyond… remember that a successful marriage doesn’t end at “I do.”
  3. Improve Customer Service. Take complaints seriously. Treat an unhappy client like an opportunity – to turn around a bad situation or just to learn from it. Make sure even your front-desk person knows how to respond to a little friction.
  4. Love Your Fans. Find your most enthusiastic supporters and encourage them to keep spreading the word about how happy they are with your gym. Don’t take them for granted.
  5. Keep It Real on Social Media. Make sure you’re accurately presenting your gym and your brand. Do it to express your values and share information, not to impress or promote a false image.
  6. Promote Client Successes. Telling stories about a customer’s victory is a classic win-win. The clients meet their goals, and you have a powerful piece to promote your services.
  7. Share Valuable Content. Most of the time, that means it’s not a direct offer or a pitch for your gym. Engaging content is interesting, educational, emotional, or even just amusing.

Engagement is a basic part of retention, which is crucial to building your business from one stage to the next. What stage are you at now? What else is important to reaching your ultimate goal?

We’re here to help you navigate your success journey. Start here with 10 easy questions that will take less than 2 minutes to answer. We know you’ll find the results engaging, to say the least.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ February 5, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Retention Invention: No Client Left Behind

It’s so easy for gym owners to focus on getting sales that they sometimes forget to spend enough time on keeping the clients they already have.

But to ignore retention is to invite failure. You need a system to ensure that you’re not leaving any client behind from month to month. Engage them continually so they stay longer, make more referrals, and spend more money.

Retention is one of the biggest indicators of how your business is doing, at any stage of its development. It’s important for a new business to bake retention strategies into its operations – and retention remains just as crucial for an established gym trying to grow or expand. 

Where’s your business in its journey to success? Click here to take our short survey to get your free evaluation. 

Plus, we all work hard to acquire clients. It’s easier and cheaper to keep them than to replace them. And with a steady month-to-month client base, you have more stability in your revenue, you can plan with confidence, and you can build a better culture for employees and customers alike.

We created our No Client Left Behind system to give you the tools to engage them from the start and throughout their time with you. The system is easy to follow and based on just a few concepts.

Here’s the key idea: A client’s most critical phase with your gym is in the first 30 days. It’s easy to see why. He or she is coming into a new environment, learning new concepts, and applying them in ways that might be awkward. Change is hard for anyone.

So, you have to make it easy on them, particularly in the first month. That involves:

  • An onboarding to welcome clients and establish expectations. You can’t let them feel like they’re wandering around in the dark.
  • Weekly reports based on attendance that you use to follow up with people who don’t show. It demonstrates that you care and reveals potential problems early.
  • Surveys also show you’re interested in the newcomer’s reactions and opinions, and they give great ideas for improving your customer experience. 

If you provide a good, clear first 30 days, you’re on the road to long-term engagement. That’s when they love working out with you because they feel great about themselves. That’s when they bring in friends and family. That’s when your gym becomes a part of their lives.

But to start, of course, you evaluate a new client so you can provide the best, most personalized experience. And with the same goal for new gyms we work with, Fitness Revolution gives our newcomers a 10-question survey that takes just 1-2 minutes to complete so we can guide their gym to success. Take it here to get started.

Next week we’ll share seven tactics to keep your clients highly engaged so they’re less likely to leave and more likely to keep bringing you more revenue.

ArticlesFor Business Owners
[ January 29, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Your Checklist to Guide Leads Through the Sales Process

Everybody wants to make a sale as quickly as possible, right? Wouldn’t it be great if we went from getting a lead to closing the deal – just like that?

Well, that’s a nice fantasy. But reality calls for a system to nurture leads through your sales funnel. You’ve got to actively guide them through it, from the first time someone expresses interest in your service to when you sell your core offer.

“Systematic nurturing” is critical but not so complicated. You need to build it with five key components.

  1. Data collection. Keep track of all leads’ names, contact information, date you got the information, and their stage in the funnel.
  2. Communication intervals. Establish a consistent rhythm for reaching out to leads and moving them to the next stage. For example, you could try, “Day 1 — Call; Day 2 — Text; Day 3 – Email.”
  3. Boundaries. What do you do if the lead responds to your outreach? What do you do if he or she doesn’t? You need to set up standards for each possibility along the way. And decide how many times you’ll try to connect before deciding it’s a dead end.
  4. Tracking. Make a note of all your efforts and results – say, each time you called or sent an email, and how the lead responded.
  5. Followed By All (FBA). Everyone on your team must take the same steps. Systematic nurturing depends on consistent execution. You want all your follow-up to look and feel the same.

To nurture your business toward your goals, you need to know where you are today. Answer 10 questions and we’ll tell you now. For free.

Now, here are three components that systematic nurturing does NOT need. These are common beliefs we have about ourselves that can hinder us in the sales process. Apply a little psychology and self-love so you’re not blocking your own progress with these limiting beliefs.

  1. A non-response means “no.” Actually, a non-response is just that and nothing more – and definitely not a rejection. Research shows it takes an average of eight follow-ups to get a meeting with a new prospect. People are too busy with their own lives to pay that much attention. They’re counting on us to make it clear we have the right solution to their problem.
  2. Follow-up makes me feel icky and annoying. Nobody likes to be obnoxious. But the key is where you apply your focus. Are you mostly concerned with what you can get out of this guy? Or are you sincerely trying to help him solve a problem? When you make that shift in thinking, you’ll see yourself as offering value, not being a bother.
  3. “I shouldn’t have to follow up. If they want me, they will call me.” It’s a variation on “If you build it, they will come” — but remember, “Field of Dreams” was a fantasy, too. In business, we have to work to engage our customers, even after we think we’ve already done our part. Consumers want businesses to take the initiative rather than passively wait. Make it easy for them by following up systematically, or you’ll lose them along the way.

Don’t limit yourself with these kinds of beliefs. Systematic nurturing gives you a guide to follow that’s more reliable than insecurity and second-guessing.

The truth is simple: Having a follow-up system for nurturing your leads is an essential part of a successful, high-functioning sales process.

Gym owners – where are you now in your path to success? Give us 2 minutes to answer 10 questions and we’ll tell you. Then, we’ll start guiding you to get where you want to be.

Get Your Free Evaluation Now