[ January 29, 2020 by Jay Croft 0 Comments ]

Your Checklist to Guide Leads Through the Sales Process

Everybody wants to make a sale as quickly as possible, right? Wouldn’t it be great if we went from getting a lead to closing the deal – just like that?

Well, that’s a nice fantasy. But reality calls for a system to nurture leads through your sales funnel. You’ve got to actively guide them through it, from the first time someone expresses interest in your service to when you sell your core offer.

“Systematic nurturing” is critical but not so complicated. You need to build it with five key components.

  1. Data collection. Keep track of all leads’ names, contact information, date you got the information, and their stage in the funnel.
  2. Communication intervals. Establish a consistent rhythm for reaching out to leads and moving them to the next stage. For example, you could try, “Day 1 — Call; Day 2 — Text; Day 3 – Email.”
  3. Boundaries. What do you do if the lead responds to your outreach? What do you do if he or she doesn’t? You need to set up standards for each possibility along the way. And decide how many times you’ll try to connect before deciding it’s a dead end.
  4. Tracking. Make a note of all your efforts and results – say, each time you called or sent an email, and how the lead responded.
  5. Followed By All (FBA). Everyone on your team must take the same steps. Systematic nurturing depends on consistent execution. You want all your follow-up to look and feel the same.

To nurture your business toward your goals, you need to know where you are today. Answer 10 questions and we’ll tell you now. For free.

Now, here are three components that systematic nurturing does NOT need. These are common beliefs we have about ourselves that can hinder us in the sales process. Apply a little psychology and self-love so you’re not blocking your own progress with these limiting beliefs.

  1. A non-response means “no.” Actually, a non-response is just that and nothing more – and definitely not a rejection. Research shows it takes an average of eight follow-ups to get a meeting with a new prospect. People are too busy with their own lives to pay that much attention. They’re counting on us to make it clear we have the right solution to their problem.
  2. Follow-up makes me feel icky and annoying. Nobody likes to be obnoxious. But the key is where you apply your focus. Are you mostly concerned with what you can get out of this guy? Or are you sincerely trying to help him solve a problem? When you make that shift in thinking, you’ll see yourself as offering value, not being a bother.
  3. “I shouldn’t have to follow up. If they want me, they will call me.” It’s a variation on “If you build it, they will come” — but remember, “Field of Dreams” was a fantasy, too. In business, we have to work to engage our customers, even after we think we’ve already done our part. Consumers want businesses to take the initiative rather than passively wait. Make it easy for them by following up systematically, or you’ll lose them along the way.

Don’t limit yourself with these kinds of beliefs. Systematic nurturing gives you a guide to follow that’s more reliable than insecurity and second-guessing.

The truth is simple: Having a follow-up system for nurturing your leads is an essential part of a successful, high-functioning sales process.

Gym owners – where are you now in your path to success? Give us 2 minutes to answer 10 questions and we’ll tell you. Then, we’ll start guiding you to get where you want to be.

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